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Fuse Box

Aussie67

Well-Known Member
As I've put a number of new things in the coupe over the past few months (AMP/ GPS tracker/ Alarm systems, etc), I'm thinking of mounting a new fuse box in the boot as I don't trust the original wiring. As all the new items are mounted in the boot, its the ideal place. I've run a new fused 4mm aluminium cable from battery to the boot, in readiness to install the fuse box. The box can be mounted under the window (they are quite small), so it won't be seen.

I've bought a couple of these, as I like the idea of the LED which lights when a fuse is blown. Saves time working out which is which when it has to be changed. They run blade fuses which are easy to find over here.

Anyone have any experience with this type of box?

s-l300.jpg


Tony
 

Horseplay

I Don't Care. Do you?
Never seen one like that but junction boxes are difficult to screw up as far as design goes so long as quality materials are used. And that makes me ask, why did you use aluminum cable? Copper is so so much better.
 

Aussie67

Well-Known Member
It looks like a straight forward install. Used aluminium cause its easier to use than copper. I find copper is a little more difficult to bend/ thread/ hide once you start going up in size. Voltage wise it's about the same.
 

Mach1 Driver

Active Member
It looks like a straight forward install. Used aluminium cause its easier to use than copper. I find copper is a little more difficult to bend/ thread/ hide once you start going up in size. Voltage wise it's about the same.
FYI, aluminum wire was used briefly here in houses, but then outlawed because when it heats up it extrudes out from under the screw connection, getting looser, and then continues to get hotter and looser until it starts a fire. I don't see why it couldn't do the same thing in a car. You've got what we would call a 6ga wire and that can handle a lot of amps- however, the less you pull the safer it will be. I'm with Terry, I wouldn't have done it.
I had an older home build during that "aluminum era". The fix was to use a short piece of copper wire at the screw connection and a special compound on the aluminum to copper wire connection in the wire nut. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct...ound/4514334&usg=AOvVaw1OIT85CpqwhJ_zU_BFfaK1
 
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Aussie67

Well-Known Member
I didn't know that. That said 12V is a far cry from 220V. Anyway might have to change it out to be safe.

Thanks for the heads up.
 
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